How to deal with stress at work and home

Dealing with Stress from Home

Create a balanced schedule. It allows you to find out about things that might be causing your children stress. Drink alcohol in moderation. And if you tend toward people-pleasing, these tips can help, too. Deal with workplace conflicts in a positive way. If your workplace is large enough, you might be able to escape a toxic environment by transferring to another department.

Unfortunately, work stress has significant health consequences that range from the relatively benign—more colds and flus—to the more serious, like heart disease and metabolic syndrome. But, because stress at work is so common, finding a low-stress job may be difficult or impossible for many people.

Managing Job and Work Stress

Here are some tips to help. And if you tend toward people-pleasing, these tips can help, too. Sometimes, our mindset can boost stress, so a small issue mushrooms into a pile of problems.

We continue worrying, somehow thinking that this is a productive — or at least inevitable — response to stress. But we mistake worry for action. Clinical psychologist Chad LeJeune, Ph. D, talks about the idea of worrying versus caring in his book, The Worry Trap: LeJeune uses the simple example of houseplants. Worrying is not watering. Similarly, fretting about your finances does nothing but get you worked up and likely prevent you from taking action.

Caring about your finances, however, means creating a budget, paying bills on time, using coupons and reducing how often you dine out. Just this small shift in mindset from worrying to caring can help you adjust your reaction to stress.

To see this distinction between worrying and caring, LeJeune includes an activity where readers list responses for each one. Another mindset that can exacerbate stress is perfectionism. Trying to be mistake-free and essentially spending your days walking on eggshells is exhausting and anxiety-provoking. Talk about putting pressure on yourself! And as we all know but tend to forget: Perfectionism is impossible and not human, anyway.

Nothing good can come from perfectionism. Plus, mistake-mistaking can lead to growth. To overcome perfectionism, Brown suggests becoming more compassionate toward yourself. How do you handle stress? What are some of your best tips? She also explores self-image issues on her own blog Weightless and creativity on her blog Make a Mess: Find help or get online counseling now.

By Margarita Tartakovsky, M. Figure out where the stress is coming from. Consider what you can control—and work on that. Do what you love. Manage your time well. Create a toolbox of techniques.

Pick off the negotiables from your plate. Rhythmic movement—such as walking, running, dancing, drumming, etc. For maximum stress relief, try to get at least 30 minutes of activity on most days. The Mental Health Benefits of Exercise: For Depression, Anxiety, and Stress.

And when stress is mounting at work, try to take a quick break and move away from the stressful situation. Take a stroll outside the workplace if possible. Physical movement can help you regain your balance.

Your food choices can have a huge impact on how you feel during the work day. Eating small, frequent and healthy meals, for example, can help your body maintain an even level of blood sugar, keeping your energy and focus up, and avoiding mood swings. Low blood sugar, on the other hand, can make you feel anxious and irritable, while eating too much can make you lethargic. Minimize sugar and refined carbs. But these "feel-good" foods quickly lead to a crash in mood and energy, making symptoms of stress worse not better.

Reduce your intake of foods that can adversely affect your mood, such as caffeine, trans fats, and foods with high levels of chemical preservatives or hormones. Eat more Omega-3 fatty acids to give your mood a boost. The best sources are fatty fish salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines , seaweed, flaxseed, and walnuts. Smoking when you're feeling stressed may seem calming, but nicotine is a powerful stimulant, leading to higher, not lower, levels of anxiety.

Drink alcohol in moderation. But skimping on sleep interferes with your daytime productivity, creativity, problem-solving skills, and ability to focus. Improve the quality of your sleep by making healthy changes to your daytime and nightly routines.

For example, go to bed and get up at the same time every day, even on weekends, be smart about what you eat and drink during the day, and make adjustments to your sleep environment. Aim for 8 hours a night—the amount of sleep most adults need to operate at their best. Turn off screens one hour before bedtime. The light emitted from TV, tablets, smartphones, and computers suppresses your body's production of melatonin and can severely disrupt your sleep.

Avoid stimulating activity and stressful situations before bedtime such as catching up on work. Instead, focus on quiet, soothing activities, such as reading or listening to soft music, while keeping lights low.

Working night, early morning, or rotating shifts can impact your sleep quality, which in turn can affect productivity and performance and leave you more vulnerable to stress. When job and workplace stress threatens to overwhelm you, there are simple, practical steps you can take to regain control. Create a balanced schedule. All work and no play is a recipe for burnout. Try to find a balance between work and family life, social activities and solitary pursuits, daily responsibilities and downtime.

Leave earlier in the morning. Even minutes can make the difference between frantically rushing and having time to ease into your day. If you're always running late, set your clocks and watches fast to give yourself extra time and decrease your stress levels.

Make sure to take short breaks throughout the day to take a walk, chat to a friendly face, or practice a relaxation technique. Also try to get away from your desk or work station for lunch. It will help you relax and recharge and be more, not less, productive. Many of us feel pressured to be available 24 hours a day or obliged to keep checking our smartphones for work-related messages and updates.

That may mean not checking emails or taking work calls at home in the evening or at weekends. Avoid scheduling things back-to-back or trying to fit too much into one day.

If you've got too much on your plate, distinguish between the "shoulds" and the "musts. Tackle high-priority tasks first. If you have something particularly unpleasant to do, get it over with early. The rest of your day will be more pleasant as a result.

Break projects into small steps. If a large project seems overwhelming, focus on one manageable step at a time, rather than taking on everything at once. Let go of the desire to control every little step.

Be willing to compromise. Many of us make job stress worse with negative thoughts and behavior. Aim to do your best, no one can ask for more than that. Flip your negative thinking. If you focus on the downside of every situation and interaction, you'll find yourself drained of energy and motivation. Try to think positively about your work, avoid negative-thinking co-workers, and pat yourself on the back about small accomplishments, even if no one else does.

Many things at work are beyond our control—particularly the behavior of other people. Rather than stressing out over them, focus on the things you can control such as the way you choose to react to problems. Look for humor in the situation. When used appropriately, humor is a great way to relieve stress in the workplace.

When you or those around you start taking things too seriously, find a way to lighten the mood by sharing a joke or funny story. Clean up your act. If your desk or work space is a mess, file and throw away the clutter; just knowing where everything is can save time and cut stress. When we feel uncertain, helpless, or out of control, our stress levels are the highest.

Here are some things you can do to regain a sense of control over your job and career. Talk to your employer about workplace stressors. Healthy and happy employees are more productive, so your employer has an incentive to tackle workplace stress whenever possible.

Rather than rattle off a list of complaints, let your employer know about specific conditions that are impacting your work performance.

Clarify your job description. Ask your supervisor for an updated description of your job duties and responsibilities. You may then be able to point out that some of the things you are expected to do are not part of your job description and gain a little leverage by showing that you've been putting in work over and above the parameters of your job.

If your workplace is large enough, you might be able to escape a toxic environment by transferring to another department. Ask for new duties. If you've been doing the exact same work for a long time, ask to try something new: If burnout seems inevitable , take a complete break from work.

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Mar 20,  · It activates the stress hormone and, if chronic, wears down confidence, concentration and well-being. She advises that you identify the aspects of the situation you can control and aspects you can't. Unfortunately, work-related stress doesn't just disappear when you head home for the day. When stress persists, it can take a toll on your health and well-being. In the short term, a stressful work environment can contribute to problems such as headache, stomachache, sleep disturbances, short temper and difficulty concentrating. Stress in the Workplace Managing Job and Work Stress. While some workplace stress is normal, excessive stress can interfere with your productivity and performance, impact your physical and emotional health, and affect your relationships and home life.